• They completely got rid of the Explore Feed, which is unfortunate. At the time I wrote this, it was still available, albeit a bit hidden.

  • I like the tagline! That would’ve made a good blog post to even be noticed by Microsoft lol. Goog luck with the rebranding and I’ll be sure to come back when I’m wondering what’s on Joe’s mind.

  • I think there’s still a waiting list, so I highly suggest you get in as soon as possible.

    Bump’s currently been my most profitable rewards app. Right now I have about $95 in stocks - eight months after I made this post.

  • My wife suggested I point out any symbolism in the flag. I didn’t add any symbolism, but the original did.

    The two H’s obviously represent Huber Heights. The circular shape they are in represents an “O” for “Ohio.”

    The two double-bands represent the two major thoroughfares that go through Huber Heights - Brandt Pike and Old Troy Pike.

    There are seventeen stars. Ohio was the seventeenth state admitted to the Union.

    Green and blue, for some reason, are colors “that had come to represent” Huber Heights. Don’t know why.

  • Thanks for the comment!

    I use Android and don’t have a Costco Membership, so that won’t work for me. How much cash back is the Costco card giving you?

  • avatar for Robert.Walter Robert.Walter

    Forget Kroger. Costco and Meijer paying with Apple Pay on a Costco Visa Card are so much better.

    Good review. Would suggest you put the using section first. No point reading all the How To Set Up given KP stinks.

  • Apparently another way to get WeBull points is to comment on stocks. I’m also seeing the stock predictor on normal order pages now?

    Point Records

  • I received the following response yesterday:

    From: Amazon Associates
    To: Me
    Date: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 10:59 am
    Subject: Your Amazon Associates Inquiry

    Hello Joe,

    This is Kim with the Amazon Associates Program. I hope your having a great week.
    Thank you for contacting us regarding your Amazon Associates account.
    Based on your response, we will not be closing your associates account at this time.

    Thank you for your participation in the Amazon Associates Program.

    Best regards,
    Kim A.

    It seems my account is safe for now.

  • Unrelated to the previous shutdown, I received another email from Amazon:

    From: Amazon Associates
    To: Me
    Date: Wednesday, April 17, 2019 10:55 am
    Subject: Your Amazon.com Associates Account

    Hello hendrixjoseph-20,

    Effective in 7 days, Amazon is terminating your Associates account as well as the Operating Agreement that governs it.

    Note that this communication is regarding only the account listed in the subject line of this email.

    Why?
    You haven’t referred any qualifying sales for more than 365 days.

    What’s next?
    You must stop using the Content and Amazon Marks and promptly remove all links to the Amazon site. You will be paid on the regular schedule for any outstanding fees that have accrued prior to this notice.

    You are welcome to reapply at any time by visiting https://affiliate-program.amazon.com.

    Thank you for your participation in the Amazon Associates Program.

    Amazon.com

    While I don’t make a ton of referrals, the last referral was in January of this year, way less than 365 days ago. I responded to Amazon’s email last night:

    Hello,

    I received an email stating that “Effective in 7 days, Amazon is terminating your Associates account” because I “haven’t referred any qualifying sales for more than 365 days.”

    However, the last time I referred a sale was January 29, 2019, which is much less than 365 days.

    I was wondering if the email was sent in error, or if there is something else I need to do.

    Thank you,

    Joe Hendrix

    I’ve yet to hear anything. We’ll see if I do get shut down again or if nothing happens.

  • It seems Amazon cannot make up their minds as to whether I am in violation or not. Today I received the following email:

    From: Amazon Associates
    To: Me
    Date: Monday, March 4, 2019 8:12 am
    Subject: Your Amazon.com Associates Account

    Dear Associate,

    Thank you for your cooperation in complying with the terms of the Operating Agreement. As a result of your response, your Associates account and your pending Advertising Fees have been reinstated.

    Your continued participation in the Associates Program indicates your acceptance of and agreement to comply with the terms of the Operating Agreement. If you would like to review the complete Operating Agreement, you can do so by following this link: https://affiliate-program.amazon.com/help/operating/agreement.

    Thank you again for your cooperation and for your participation in the Associates Program.

    Warmest Regards,

    Amazon.com
    http://www.amazon.com/associates

  • Yes, trading fees would probably change things a bit.

    I only “buy” or “sell” if the previous day was not the same as before. So if there are multiple consecutive days of “sell” or “hold,” then no transactions occur on those days.

  • avatar for Mikeh Mikeh

    In your example, after a sale you automatically buy back in at market regardless of the price change while you held? Would be interesting to calculate this with trading fees.

  • Hi Kim!

    Print-on-demand is where the product isn’t printed until a sale is made. In the case of t-shirts, I provide a design to be printed on the t-shirt, and then when the website sells a t-shirt with that design, they’ll print the design on a t-shirt and ship it to the customer. I don’t have to keep an inventory of any physical products at all, and the website (Redbubble, Amazon, etc) shares the profit of the sale with me.

  • Joe, i guess we have a few things in common, I’m a #lifelonglearner too, & am in total agreement about the possibilities of jobs on Amazon, except what is a print on demand?

  • that’s probably the part most people get stuck at, thinking they can transact on the account via their normal Vanguard login. As a software engineer by trade, I understand why they have this limitation, although a simple solution would be to put a link in the “You don’t have the authority to transact on this account.” message to the small business web page for their Solo 401ks.

    I’m glad my post was helpful!

  • avatar for CK CK

    Thanks for the post, helpful as I got stuck at the error saying “You don’t have the authority to transact on this account.” portion and didn’t realize I had to create a separate small business account.

  • Content is the marketing king for blogging and it needs to give a top priority for a B2b marketer. Longer blog content tent to perform well in search engine and average word count number increasing year by year. This statistics helps a lot to empower the blog

  • Absolutely! I have some bond funds in my traditional retirement accounts (401k and IRA). I also own a small amount of cryptocurrency (mainly bitcoin, litecoin, ethereum, monero, and ripple). Currently no valuable metals, and no foreign currency (i.e. forex) outside of a few bills of foreign cash, but that’s more for novelty reasons.

    I used to run my Antminer s3, but the electricity cost exceeded my profits (in other words, I would do better just buying the bitcoin outright).

    I also “invest” in passive income and am constantly trying to pick up new skills.

  • Do you also invest in anything else besides stocks? Maybe bonds, cryptocurrency, valuable metals, forex? I find that diversifying your risk is best and investing a small percent of your income into different things will yield the best results over time. Take crypto for example: invest 2% of your monthly income, over 10 years, buying 20-40 altcoins and Bitcoin and you will be seating on a big chunk of change. If you get in now, while the prices per one coin are low, in a few years, you can make hundreds of times more.

  • avatar for prof prem raj pushpakaran prof prem raj pushpakaran

    prof prem raj pushpakaran writes – let us celebrate eDay (Euler’s number or Napier’s constant) on February 7 !!!!

  • My hat’s off to you for recording this timeline of events! We had a similar experience with the crazy medical billing system surrounding childbirth services with the birth of our first son. In our case, we had contracted with a freestanding birthing center operated primarily by midwives, with a fallback option of a local hospital should it be necessary.

    We began labor at the birth center, but complications resulted in a move to the hospital. We were fielding bills from the birth center, hospital services, and physician services at once! Throw in pre-payments, an HSA, and an out-of-state provider, and you can imagine the headache. We were billed in duplicate as well, and I can vouch for the fact that if we weren’t on top of things would definitely have over-paid.

    Congratulations on a year of accomplishments, highlighted by the birth of your son!

  • Your son’s a cutie! This is a really interesting look at pregnancy and finances. “If I hadn’t been on top of things, there is no way I would have known I don’t actually owe ten grand.” This is the reason I force myself to stay on top of my medical expenses (of which there are many) and insurance matters, even though it sometimes sounds like Greek to me. I can only imagine how many people pay bills they don’t owe because they haven’t tracked what their insurance does.

  • Huh, I didn’t know earning season was a thing. I noticed there were a lot of earnings reports, but since I just started this, I just assumed that there were this many earning reports all year long.

  • Good job on the month earning season can be hard. Options are my favorite but you’re right they are very hard to manage. I consider each trade even a losing one worth the money in tuition on how the stock market works. I’ve read and studied a lot of strategies and theories but there’s no learning like jumping in yourself to see what happens.

  • I love these kind of thorough timelines with lots of numbers thrown in. I have always been in government work instead of big money lawyer jobs, but everytime (twice) I had a baby at the hospital and only had to pay a $300 anesthesiologist bill, I was happy with my benefits. congrats on the good looking abby!

  • avatar for Angie Angie

    Giving birth was probably the most expensive thing I’ve ever done… Add that up with a house flood right before I went into Labor, and my company being bought out and getting notice of my employment being temporary with the new company… and we’ve got the perfect trifecta. I’m SO broke. LOL, but she’s worth it.

  • Having children is expensive, before they are born and especially as they grow. Insurance companies, hospitals, etc. don’t make it easy so sometimes you aren’t prepared for expenses that should be covered but aren’t.

  • Babies are so expensive, and a lot of these expenses were from before the baby was born, so imagine as the baby continues to age! Sometimes people don’t consider all of these expenses, and then struggle when the actual baby comes along. Great post, super informative! xxx

    Melina www.melinaelisa.com
  • In the past, I have owed a few different individual stocks. Currently, I just invest in funds. I am not opposed to investing in individual securities. It takes more time and research than simply using a few index funds. It can be rewarding, but also more risky.

  • I primarily invest in index funds, but hold several direct stocks too. I will say the trade war talk this year hasn’t been helpful in the most recent months on many of my individual positions, but my index funds have had a healthy 2018 for the most part.

    And, they’re less maintenance than checking the headlines each week for each individual stock position to look for scandals, lost contracts, hostile takeovers, etc.

  • Index fund is the way to go. I also own some stock through my employer’s ESPP and can’t help but hold onto it. Maybe it’s tunnel vision, and the past is no indication of the future, but with 20% average returns it’s tough to not hold onto it.

  • I bought Plug Power because I thought it was a solar power company. I only bought one share at two bucks, though, and I plan on sticking with my buy-and-hold plan despite this.

  • i used to own about 35 thousand dollars of plug power stock and make some profit but will never own a crappy company like that again. here’s the article if you’re interested https://freddysmidlap.com/2017/10/18/my-17000-nap/

    good luck with the investing.

    freddy

  • avatar for Michael S Miller Michael S Miller

    These are such great questions. I love the variety and how they can be tailored to different personalities

  • How sweet that you read to your son! Starting at an early age can make him a lifelong reader (my parents did the same for me and I LOVE books).

  • seems right. keep in mind you’ll have to differentiate between the electricity your miner uses, and the electricity everything else on the bill uses.

    also, the reward isn’t constant (despite it being the same for each block) since the amount of people on the pool fluctuates.

  • avatar for KarlJay KarlJay

    I’m trying to get a handle on the numbers. Based on what you say, the rewards per day on the S9 would be about $34.23

    https://www.google.com/search?&q=how+much+is+0.0052685+bitcoins

    Based on that, you’d pay for the S9 in about 1 month without counting for electricity (34.23 X 30 = $1,026)

    So that would mean if your electricity bill were < $1,026 month, you’d make a profit. So if you’re paying $0.10/Kwhr and using 33/day… 33X0.10 = $3.30/day which is $99/month. So you should have made about $925/month. Am I right or am I missing something?

  • That’s so annoying when there’s little nuances like that in the terms for loan accounts. While not as bad, I had a student loan account that would only allow me to make at most 8 payments a month. I tend to make several payments to my debts every month since I come across small amounts of money frequently, so it wasn’t uncommon for me to reach that 8 payment limit.

  • These are great points! I’ve heard a lot of people talk about the $$ they save making twice monthly payments - so I was going to sign up to do the same (on our old house; we’re renters now!) but then I realized the company actually CHARGED US EXTRA to do it that way - I was so annoyed when they presented as a way to “save money” because I bet a LOT of people actually bought into that.

  • Nice analysis! I used to do the same thing, chipping in what I could when I could. My mortgage issuer even had a bi-weekly plan where they showed how much sooner you could pay off your mortgage if you used that. In addition to paying more often, you got the bonus of getting an extra months worth of mortgage paid each year.

    Not a huge difference, but still better than going with their default pay off rate.

  • avatar for Kayla Sloan Kayla Sloan

    This is an interesting post! I never knew you could replace a cabin air filter. Now I wonder if my vehicle has one. I will have to check it out!

  • avatar for Kayla Sloan Kayla Sloan

    So cute! My parents read to me and I think it made me excel in English, reading comprehension, etc. Even if it seems like it isn’t making a difference it probably is. And as you pointed out, for your own reading, at least you are ahead of last year. Improvement is improvement. I’ve read about 15 books this year so far, but then again, I don’t have a baby to take care of.

  • Liked this post. If only everything was so simple.

    I am a software engineer. And I decided to take a break because I was miserable at work. And the moment I made that decision, something changed. In the next two weeks, I realized that I like my job.

    The only things that changed is that I stopped going to unnecessary meetings and did my work the way it should be done, not concentrating on all the low hanging fruits.

    I now know, everything is in my head.

  • I don’t pay anything for Alexa, and I wouldn’t suggest it. Just plug in any website url into it’s siteinfo page and it will let you know some basic info.

    For instance, if I plug in your site (https://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/howtobrain.com) it shows me your global rank is 8,867,792 as of this comment. That means your site is the 8,867,792nd most visited site in their system - although it is just an estimate. Supposedly that number is updated daily, but in my experience it takes longer.

  • avatar for Mandy Mills Mandy Mills

    I looked into Alexa, and it seems like a very useful tool. The price seems quite high though and there isn’t a free version? Do you think it is worth the cost?

  • I haven’t looked into it, but I would suspect that pageviews would increase the more posts are published. This would be for a number or reasons. First, at least for me, I tend to promote new posts the most. If I haven’t published a post in a while, I tend not to publish. Two, having more pages means there’s more pages to view. Lastly, people probably prefer to read newer posts.

  • Hey Joe! I find that my pageviews seem to be highly correlated to the number of posts I publish. Is that the case for you as well? It would be interesting to see what percent your pageviews increase by if you increase your posting by x%.

  • At that point, I’m not sure it could be solved in a single equation, although I could see something along the lines of how long would it take you to reach a certain savings rate. For instance, if your income currently equals you expenses (i.e. a savings rate of 0%) how long would it take to reach a 50% savings rate if you get a 3% raise every year and save it?

    I just did a quick excel sheet, and the answer to that question that looks like around 24 years:

    year income savings savings rate
    0 100 0 0.0%
    1 103 3 2.9%
    2 106.09 6.09 5.7%
    3 109.27 9.27 8.5%
    4 112.55 12.55 11.2%
    5 115.92 15.92 13.7%
    6 119.40 19.40 16.3%
    7 122.98 22.98 18.7%
    8 126.67 26.67 21.1%
    9 130.47 30.47 23.4%
    10 134.39 34.39 25.6%
    11 138.42 38.42 27.8%
    12 142.57 42.57 29.9%
    13 146.85 46.85 31.9%
    14 151.25 51.25 33.9%
    15 155.79 55.79 35.8%
    16 160.47 60.47 37.7%
    17 165.28 65.28 39.5%
    18 170.24 70.24 41.3%
    19 175.35 75.35 43.0%
    20 180.61 80.61 44.6%
    21 186.02 86.02 46.2%
    22 191.61 91.61 47.8%
    23 197.35 97.35 49.3%
    24 203.27 103.27 50.8%
  • Nice analysis! The math behind this gets tricky fast. I tried to do the math around this same analysis but adding on the idea:

    What if you get a 3% raise every year and save it?

    That makes the math MUCH harder. I know that would lower these times, but I’m unsure of how much that’d impact things. It would impact the lowest saving rate people the most, but be interesting to see how it impacts people in the middle range.

  • avatar for Kayla Sloan Kayla Sloan

    Reading to your kids is so important. My parents read to me all the time and I ended up way ahead in language skills. Good for you guys for starting off early on the right foot!

  • Awww I’m a bit late in this! I’m so sorry!

    Congratulations on the new family member! Sooo cute! He’s sleeping so peacefully!! ❤️

    You sound like you’re superrr busy but looks like you’re doing a great job at balancing your life. This is really awesome news!

    I wish you and your family the best!!!

  • That’s really good, Joe! High five! 😉

    It’s good to be handy and that’s something I don’t have haha. I do t think I’d have patience for that. Luckily my fiancé will YouTube and attempt to save us money when he can do it himself haha.

  • avatar for Kayla Sloan Kayla Sloan

    Congratulations on your new family member! I hope all are doing well - he looks so sweet in this photo and nice and healthy!

  • Hi Joe,

    Congratulation on your new baby boy, he is a trust - a blessing from God, and that’s what matters most.

    As for the insurance issues and stuff, things will definitely fall into place.

    I just read your comment on Janice Wald’s blog , so I followed you here to find out more about you.

    Once again, congrats!

  • avatar for RS RS

    Yes, I was trying to indicate present value with PV. I agree, you have to make some assumptions but only time will tell how good some assumptions are. A couple years ago we would have assumed gas prices would continue to be more than $4/gallon. I think we agree, even with assumptions and simplifications it helps to run the numbers.

  • PV = present value? I guess my car example had one more assumption that I didn’t list: you’re paying for the car in cash (i.e. not financing). The other assumptions (all other maintenance costs are the same, gas prices are constant, and your current car is worth zero) are not realistic; I admit this in the explanation below the “answer.” This problem of bad assumptions is simply to make the math easier in the case of examples - you see it all the time in physics problems with frictionless planes and spherical cows.

    And you’re absolutely right - a car that gets 50 mpg probably will cost a lot more than $7,200, which means, money-wise at least, it’s best to stick with your current car.

  • avatar for RS RS

    I’m not sure what you think of your car example. The question posed was How much should you pay for a car that gets 50 mpg? Your answer is $7,200, which is inflated PV because you neglected the return rate. Because you are not going to find a new car for $7,200, and extremely unlikely to find even a used car, the decision should be keep driving the current car until it’s dead. The largest cost of a car is the capital expense. If you have a paid off car- keep driving it. This also provides the opportunity to save for the next car. If you actually have the money in hand, invest it and earn more. When you are in the market for a car, you can compare the standard efficiency and high efficiency models this way too determine if the EXTRA cost is worth it.

  • This is a nice explanation and discussion. I think LED bulbs are an interesting test case. The payback period was much quicker than I expected. I know with older CFLs I felt that they rarely lived long enough to justify the premium cost.

  • avatar for onfirebuilder onfirebuilder

    Steve Thanks for sharing,

    I test and analyze existing and new home efficiency for a living, and I would love to add some of the nuances to the discussion. The problem is that when most people including many mechanical engineers are “running the numbers”, the assumptions being used don’t match the reality of the building. Question, should I add insulation or air seal or both? That’s easy every ignores air sealing because they don’t measure it or understand how it impacts the insulation ability to work. So they insulate but don’t get the return cause the insulation doesn’t work as expected. So in addition to running the numbers, validating the assumptions is important, otherwise all you end up with is deemed savings which aren’t as good as actual returns.

    So with the LED example the important factors are to get a light has a high lumen per watt ratio at a minimum, and if adoption is important, get one the matches the quality of light being replaced. To get the answer for lighting you need frequency of use, so the kitchen lights will have a faster payback than the back closet, even with same bulb swap. Another factor that comes into play is that the reduction in watts from incandescent = reduction in BTU’s, 1Kwh=3412BTU/hr. One Ton of cooling capacity is 12000Btu/hr so replacing the lights can have a substantial internal gain reduction. If you don’t use ac or any types fans to cool, maybe you get to sweat a little less (priceless) If the lights are located in recess fixtures exposed to an attic it gets more complex because of the heat transfer through the attic.

    There is one other factor to consider in payback that doesn’t occur in most other investments. What is the tax rate on gains from efficiency measures? if you have a simple payback of 10 years, and the life of the improvement is 30 years, you have no tax on the investment “returns” that you experience in year 20-30. Even better your tax rate may be negative due to government incentive. As the FI community well understands a dollar that you never have to spend is way better than a dollar that you have to generate by work or investment income.

    Calculating the ROI is like creating a budget, looking back on your expenses after the fact helps you to calibrate the budget to reality.

  • Well done. I spent my career evaluating capital projects for the complex I worked at. We typically didn’t fund projects that took longer than three years to payout, with the exception of energy saving projects that we’d accept maybe a five year payout on. But that was because we had more projects than we had money to invest. For a family 8 to 10 year payback is probably about right.

  • I’ve noticed a recent huge uptick on search hits for this page. It seems that the Facebook Explore feed is indeed gone, at least as of March 1, 2018. I wrote this article on November 9, 2017.

    I hope they bring it back, I really liked it. I can’t imagine it costs that much to maintain, but I could be wrong.

    Sources:

    https://techcrunch.com/2018/03/01/facebook-ends-its-experiment-with-the-alternative-explore-news-feed/

    https://www.engadget.com/2018/03/01/facebook-ends-explore-feed-test/

    https://www.theverge.com/2018/3/1/17067700/facebook-explore-feed-experiment-ended

    https://mashable.com/2018/03/01/facebook-ends-explore-news-feed-test/

  • avatar for Jaye Jaye

    I don’t think I’ve used those tools, or if I have I don’t know it.

    I love the transparency!

  • avatar for Jaye Jaye

    I am so envious. I’d love a new master bath. I’m not near as brave as you, though, to take it on myself.

    ~Jaye

  • avatar for Linda Stuart Linda Stuart

    Good luck, Joey! Sounds like a huge project, but well worth it in the end. The tub especially will be great for bathing your son when he is older.

  • avatar for Kayla Sloan Kayla Sloan

    Interesting. I like to be transparent too, just in a different way. In the past I have shared my monthly income to inspire others and show that you can make money through freelancing and virtual assistant work. As your site grows and you share this info it may inspire others as well.

  • Thanks for the post–I’ve been trying to crunch the numbers on solar panels, but the different lease/buy options make it tough. This reminds me to take another look. And it’s hard to shell out so much money for a single LED lightbulb, so it’s gratifying to see how the math works.

  • I know! I even tried to make it worse in my example by only using it 8 hours a day instead of a full 24, and it still paid for itself fairly quickly.

  • Just over two months to pay off the light bulb!?! That’s pretty awesome. And yeah, our planet is in a bit of a crunch, so it’s worth making some changes just to consider future generations.

  • Lol the dryer thing sounds like something I would do. My wife once gave me her wet swimsuit in a grocery bag and told me to hand it up in the shower. She wanted me to take it out of the grocery bag and hang it in such a way that it would dry. Instead, I just hung up the grocery bag in the shower.

    I used to have trouble with the word infamous too, until I realized it’s sort of on a spectrum of (famous for good — unknown person — infamous for bad).

  • Hey Joe,

    Very insightful! It happens to me all the time that I miss things I’m being told, because I can have an extremely mechanical mind. For example, my wife can tell me to take the wet clothes from the washer and put them in the dryer; and I will, but sometimes I won’t turn on the dryer because she didn’t ask me to. I don’t automatically assume that unspoken next step.

    Oh and I always have trouble with the word “infamous”. To my logic, it should mean someone that is not famous!

    Cheers, Miguel

  • I’ve tried survey sites but I feel that my earnings from it is not commensurate to my hard work. So now I’m blogging and freelance writing.

  • Hey Joe,

    I really like the light bulb example, it makes it very clear, how energy efficiency can result in real money savings. It’s easy to wrongly assume that something more expensive is always more costly, even if it’s actually cheaper over the long run.

    Cheers, Miguel

  • Ooohhh I like how the car example reverses it a bit to help you find out your budget. Because that’s one of the things I was going to say: for me, at least, we’re in such a crunch with the planet right now that I’m willing to pay a little more for anything that’s going to help reduce the harm.

  • Jetpack is a WordPress thing, right? This blog isn’t WordPress, so I don’t know much about any plugins. And I, too, don’t understand much of what Google Analytics offers. I’m thinking of taking one of Google’s free courses on the subject later this year.

  • Thanks for the links Joe, so far I only used Jetpack and Google analytics (and still don’t understand how to read most of the info on the latest!) I will check out adsense and Alexa. But I do find it gets me sidetracked when I check numbers too much. Cheers

  • avatar for Kayla Sloan Kayla Sloan

    I agree that an upfront investment isn’t necessarily the way to go if you want to build your income or retirement income. These are some good ideas.

  • avatar for Wesley Wesley

    So, I ran those numbers for my own personal expenses. Thanks, you’ve depressed me thoroughly. Math sucks sometimes!

  • Hi Joe!

    Great list here! I’ve heard of Merch by Amazon and I was interested in looking more into it, but I’m not sure where to start. It’s something I’ll have to dig further into.

    I’ve made money by picking up free furniture and giving them a face lift. It’s really fun too! Ok, fine… there are small up cost investments such as paint, paint brushes, and sand paper. But it’s not too much! I’ve also made money by picking up free stuff (i.e. clothing in excellent condition) to sell. Honestly, I am surprised with the stuff these ppl give away sometimes… I’ve seen online ads where people are desperate for you to take away their stuff. It doesn’t come up a lot, but I’ve tried it and it’s not too shabby.

  • This is really great to see. You often hear a lot about the snowball method being the ideal method to pay off debt, but you don’t really see the math showing the difference over time. Thanks for sharing this, Joe.

  • avatar for Kayla Sloan Kayla Sloan

    Interesting read about your life. I have quite a bit of public speaking experience. Recording yourself is a great tool to help you change and correct how you speak in front of others so I commend you for using it. Keep practicing and you’ll get more comfortable and better.

  • I’ve installed analytics and I also use Adsense as an indicator. Alexa was mentioned to me and I’ve used it a couple of times. But I think I’m going to start ignoring my traffic stats for now bc I find that it can be distracting to me haha! I’m just going to blog at my pace and learn what I can. I don’t want to feel discouraged from seeing odd swings in my traffic >.<

  • Hey Joe - thanks for the recap.

    The tools you mentioned here appear to be useful. I’m just using Google Analytics and WordPress at the moment , but I need to get more involved with the other tools and marketing / promoting aspects.

    Thanks again for the post. - Mike

  • Do you mean the credit card rewards? There’s really no time commitment involved, although it does force me to pay closer attention to my budget, which is a good thing.

  • Not bad at all. One thing I won’t do is the accounts rewards - I think this takes too much time to manage and that this time can be used for something that scales much better (e.g. creates value and insane profits :).

  • Awesome goals–and I like the distinction between abstract and concrete, too! Also congrats on all the huge upcoming milestones!!!! I’m also pretty optimistic about 2018. I don’t have sure thing increased income or anything, but I’m trying to do more things for myself personally and professionally. As I’m booking these big things I’m looking forward to, I’m realizing how much energy they can give you and how taxing it can be to put yourself on the back burner for an extended period of time.

  • Love the distinction between abstract and concrete goals. And also great ideas on New Year’s Resolution, I’m getting some of them to add on mine :) Congratulations to your baby and your upcoming graduation, Joe. Go for the goals!

  • avatar for Kayla Sloan Kayla Sloan

    Yes, spam comments are a problem we all seem to get hit with. I haven’t yet found a magic cure that takes care of all of them.

  • My wife and I aren’t great cooks, so that really makes us more inclined to eat out. We’re working on this, though, starting with the most simple of dishes!

  • Congratulations! I really like the way you laid out your goals in different categories. Our achilles heel is also eating out. My husband and I are challenging each other this month to not eat out at all. It’s been a struggle but we are hoping it will enable us to start cooking more in the future as well. Good luck with your goals!

  • I don’t usually do yearly goals too much. I like my monthly goals the best. Yours seem to be very doable and I’m sure you will succeed! If you save more and think the money isn’t there you tend to spend less, that is what I do. I just pretend I don’t have any!

  • These are awesome, yet do-able goals! Iceland looks amazing too… I definitely want to spend less, save more, be better about money in general. And be more present.

  • Congratulations on your bundle of joy, this year will truly be a good year for you. These goals look good and achievable without going overboard and being too strict. This year, I chose to follow my impulses and see what happens.

  • Congratulations to your baby! And these are great New Years resolutions!! I hope my husband and I will get pregnant this year!

    Nathalie http://apinchofaustria.com

  • I started losing my hair in my 20s. I’m not bald, but my hair is sparse enough that I’ve worn a simple buzzcut for years. It’s easy to maintain with my own clippers, and I just get a professional cut a couple times a year when it starts looking untidy around the back.

    I did Toastmasters for a few years, but lost track of my group after I moved. I may have to see if there’s another group locally to join.

  • avatar for Kayla Sloan Kayla Sloan

    I did not really set goals for this year. However, my word for this year is “simplify”. I used to set too many goals and it was making me feel pressured instead of inspired. That’s why I choose a theme, if you will, and strive to achieve it.

  • Depending on your electrical rates, mining is hard to even break even with electrical costs. I think I’m breaking even at 10¢ a kilowatt-hour. All the pools I’ve been using have “withdrawal” or “cash-out” fees which cover any transaction fees. Time is normally near-instant, except for bitcoin, which right now seems to be backlogged - but they’re working on a “lightning” network which should speed things up.

  • Pretty interesting. Have you looked at the transaction time/fees for each crypto? I was looking into mining, but it only seems to work in a bull crypto market. I’d rather just be long the crypto instead of owning hardware too!

  • unfortunately I only had one item because my listings had expired and i hadn’t gotten around to relisting them since I was headed out for a week for new year’s. they should be back up now

  • It looks like you made about $5,500. Not bad. And it looks like you sold even more items since 10 days ago when you published this post. Your eBay store is almost sold out (only 1 item left).

    99to1percent recently posted: How I make 6 Figures Working Only 16 hours/week https://99to1percent.com/six-figures-working-16-hours-week/

  • Mechanical Turk is fairly low-pay, so it’s definitely a last-priority side gig. it’s great to do mindless batches while watching Netflix

  • I love seeing these kinds of income reports. I’m kinda surprised by Mechanical Turk accounting for so much. I used it once several years ago, but never made more than a dollar or two. Maybe I need to check it out again.

  • Your year was full of experiments, congratulations Joe! Also you are getting into affiliate marketing as well, I think you have a lot of potential considering what you now know and it seems you are on track.

  • avatar for Kayla Sloan Kayla Sloan

    I’m not sure how many books I have read this year, actually. I do love to read, though, and almost always vow to read more when I make my own New Year’s resolutions each year.

  • Dad’s Guide to Pregnancy For Dummies sounds interesting. when we were pregnant we got most of our information from YouTube videos. They were very addictive, we would spend a whole Saturday watching them :-)

    99to1percent recently posted: What Do You Do For A Living? https://99to1percent.com/what-do-you-do-living/

  • Loved Don Quixote. Though it was certainly a labor of love. Like you, took me a few years to get through it end to end. Happily found it a much easier flow in the second half. Having also read “Millionaire Next Door” I’m betting you know all the tricks now for early retirement? :)

  • The Gh/s and the watts columns are just from the bitcoin wiki here -> https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Mining_hardware_comparison

    Those are basically the advertised rates.

    The reward / block column is just plugging in the Gh/s column into equation shown earlier on the post (but I’ll repeat it here):

    reward / day is just the reward / block column multiplied by 24

    kWh / day is the watts column multiplied by 24 and divided by 1000

  • avatar for Gary W Gary W

    Nice explanation and breakdown you have given to us, i am just curious on the number in based on different antminer you listed. How to you derived the numbers there?

  • This is a great write up and a very interested read. I am interested in bitcoin and see where the technology goes, although I don’t intend to buy any myself. I think I have a lot more research to do before buying any.

  • Nice post about Bitcoin mining. I am not too interested in mining or earning bitcoin, but I am curious to see where bitcoins go as more people start to use them. If more online stores accepted cryptocurrencies, especially the big ones that would be huge for me.

  • It’s interesting to see the numbers behind what I have often wondered about. I probably won’t ever be able to simply live off the interest my savings and investments make, but I am still going to keep building them!

  • I created a spreadsheet that models how many stocks you would need to make X dividend income, and conversely how much dividend income you would get for X investment. It’s really popular, and I’m not surprised - people realize that dividend income is the ultimate passive income source.

  • The biggest change was including keywords in the brand name in addition to bullet points & t-shirt name. I also got very lucky with a certain design that really took off.

  • I wish I had a time machine! Do you think they’d let me take a pocket full of cash with me?

    This is good advice, though. You have to weather those storms.

  • “there is more money to be made when a market is in decline.” Unfortunately a lot of people panic in these times and take money out of the market. Ultimately I think wealth from the stock market comes to those who leave the money in the market.

  • I don’t put too much time into it - maybe a few hours a week. As far as 2018, I fear my royalties may go down since Amazon is increasing their fees. I’ve been expanding into other print-on-demand sites, namely Redbubble and Teespring, but I haven’t had nearly the success with those two as I’ve had with Merch by Amazon.

  • Nice consistent growth right there! How much time to you put into it? And what are your projections for 2018?

    Blog Report for First Full Month (9,262 pageviews) Stats & Strategies https://99to1percent.com/blog-report-first-full-month/

  • Hi Joe, many thanks for this article. As the writer of a new blog, I’m looking for the best ways for readers to comment on my work and provide valuable feedback. I’ll certainly keep up to date on your posts, thank you.

  • Nice work here! I tend to stick with the set and forget approach to investing - dollar-cost averaging into boring index funds. That plus some real estate to keep things diversified.

  • Thanks for sharing! I have actually never listened to any of these podcasts. While I don’t listen to podcasts much, I usually check out smart passive income and entrepreneur on fire

  • I added a reply feature - it only goes one deep. Also, Staticman supports a subscribe feature, but you have to have (or rather, I have to have) a Mailgun account, but I don’t want to pay for it.

    Oh, and I made our last two comments into replies manually :)

  • It’s pretty cool :) I had to check back to find your reply though - some sort of subscribe to comments or replies, and a reply feature would improve it, but it doesn’t look like that’s possible from the Staticman site right now.. maybe in the future!

  • Hey Joe, Staticman sounds really interesting, I’m curious to see it in action! I’d used Disqus when I tried Jekyll and was overall happy with it, but at least with Staticman the comments aren’t on a third party. I really like the idea of Jekyll, but I just found it too fiddly overall, for reasons like this!

  • Good article! simply explained the difference between JavaBean and a POJO for which i have been looking for, POJOs, however, are everywhere and the a backlash against the reasons for EJBs has led to extensive use of ‘lightweight’ Java growth.Thanks for sharing!